Why the Skilled Trade Is Right For Women?

In the recent past, welding was one of the skilled trades where women were in high demand.

It happened in the period after World War II.

Mothers and wives started taking the chance of becoming skilled workers.

In the 1940s, the cultural icon of the war, Rosie the Riveter, urged women to take up male work.

Consequently, one of the careers that best fit them was welding.

Nowadays, people still consider joining materials a “non-traditional” trade for female workers.

Although, the entrepreneurs in demand of different genders at vacant workplaces search to employ women, says a former star of “Dirty Jobs” Mike Rowe.

In fact, welding is one of the careers that female employees should consider as promising.

Pros of the Welding Career

A few weighty advantages make welding a great occupation for women of nearly all ages.

The matter is the average age of a welder in the US is 55 years which makes the job available to you in your 30s and in your 50s.

As a result, this field is promising for any woman seeking to become a professional skilled worker.

After graduating from trade school, women gain an opportunity to live the life which is less sedentary.

In addition, female welders create buildings and bridges with their hands and travel more which gives them freedom.

Obviously, if you obtain additional welder’s certificate, you will have the opportunity to work flexible hours in a specific industry.

According to their skills, women can choose to be tutors, inspectors, equipment maintainers, managers, and deliverers.

Why Female Welders Earn More

Specifically, women study languages and programming.

Female welders often apply these skills in their welding career.

Of course, you have to study welding in a trade school or at some courses that last from one to four years.

But no matter how soon you have graduated, you will always find a vacant welder’s position since the technologies and equipment become more and more developed.

Moreover, you can choose to become self-employed.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as much as 7% of welders and 17.5% of construction workers are self-employed.

As a welder, you can earn an average of $44,960 per year which is quite promising compared to an average female office worker’s wage.


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